Alignments

While it's often referred to simple as an "alignment" or "wheel alignment" it's really complex suspension angles that are being measured and a variety of suspension components that are being adjusted. This makes an alignment an important suspension-tuning tool that greatly influences the operation of the vehicle's tires.

Out of alignment conditions occurs when the suspension and steering systems are not operating at their desired angles. Out of alignment conditions are most often caused by spring sag or suspension wear like ball joints and bushings  on an older vehicle. They can also be the result of an impact with a pothole or curb, or a change in vehicle ride height on any vehicle regardless of age. 

Incorrect alignment settings will usually result in more rapid tire wear. Therefore, alignment should be checked whenever new tires or suspension components are installed, and any time unusual tire wear patterns appear. Alignment should also be checked after the vehicle has encountered a major road hazard or curb.  

The different types of alignments offered today are front-end, thrust angle, and four-wheel. During a front-end alignment, only the front axle's angles are measured and adjusted. Front-end alignments are fine for some vehicles featuring a solid rear axle, but confirming that the front tires are positioned directly in front of the rear tires is also important.

On a solid rear axle vehicle, this requires a thrust angle alignment that allow the technician to confirm that all four wheels are "square" with each other. Thrust angle alignments also identify vehicles that would "do track" going down the road with the rear end offset from the front. If the trust angle isn't zero on many solid rear axle vehicles, a trip to a frame straightening shop is required to return the rear axle to its original location.

On all vehicles with four-wheel  independent suspensions, or front-wheel drive vehicles with adjustable rear suspensions the appropriate alignment is a four-wheel alignment. This procedure "squares' the vehicle like a thrust angle alignment, and also includes measuring and adjusting the rear axle angles as well as the front.

Not all vehicles are easily adjustable or fully adjustable. Some vehicles require aftermarket kits to allow sufficient adjustment to compensate for accident damage or the change in alignment due to installation of lowering springs.

When aligning a vehicle, it's appropriate for the vehicle to be carrying its "typical" load. This is important for drivers who continuously carry loads in their vehicles, such as sales representatives with samples or literature in the trunk. Additionally, when a vehicle is used for autocross or track events, some racers will sit in their car, or have the alignment shop "ballast" their vehicle to include the influence of the driver's weight on the suspension angles.

The primary static suspension angles that need to be measured and adjusted are the caster, camber, toe and thrust angle.

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